Cancer Communications
indexed by SCI
BMC

[ Special series on lung cancer 2 ]
doi: 10.1186/s40880-016-0170-7
Effect of body mass index on survival of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer
Hao-Jun Xie, Xu Zhang, Zhen-Qiang Wei, Hao Long, Tie-Hua Rong and Xiao-Dong Su
Department of Thoracic Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center; Lung Cancer Institute, Sun Yat-Sen University
[Abstract]

Background
Body mass index (BMI) has a U-shaped association with lung cancer risk. However, the effect of BMI on prognosis is controversial. This retrospective study aimed to investigate the effect of BMI on the survival of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after surgical resection.
Methods
In total, 624 consecutive stage I NSCLC patients who underwent radical resection were classified into four groups according to their BMI: underweight (BMI < 18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (BMI = 18.5–22.4 kg/m2), overweight (BMI = 22.5–28.0 kg/m2), and obese (BMI > 28.0 kg/m2). The effect of BMI on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox proportional hazards model. Postoperative complications in each group were analyzed using the Chi square test or Fisher’s exact test.
Results
A univariate analysis showed that PFS and OS were longer in the overweight group than in other groups (both P < 0.05). A multivariate analysis showed that OS was longer in the overweight group than in other groups (compared with the other three groups in combination: hazard ratio [HR] = 1.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30–2.68, P = 0.003; compared with the underweight group: HR = 2.24, 95% CI 1.18–4.25, P = 0.013; compared with the normal weight group: HR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.07–2.33, P = 0.022; compared with the obese group: HR = 2.87, 95% CI 1.48–5.59, P = 0.002), but PFS was similar among the groups (HR = 1.28, 95% CI 0.97–1.68, P = 0.080). A subgroup analysis showed an association between being overweight and prolonged OS in patients at stage T1a (P = 0.024), T1b (P = 0.051), and T2a (P = 0.02), as well as in patients with a non-smoking history (P = 0.001). Overweight patients had lower rates of postoperative complications, such as respiratory failure (compared with the underweight and obese groups: P = 0.014), myocardial infarction (compared with the obese group: P = 0.033), and perioperative death (compared with the other three groups: P = 0.016).
Conclusions
Preoperative BMI is an independent prognostic factor for stage I NSCLC patients after resection, with overweight patients having a favorable prognosis.
Chinese Journal of Cancer 2017, Volume: 36, Issue 1
[ PDF Full-text ]
[ Html full-text / Citation export] (BioMed Central)

[Google Scholar]


[ More articles of the special series on lung cancer 2 ]


Cite this article

Hao-Jun Xie, Xu Zhang, Zhen-Qiang Wei, Hao Long, Tie-Hua Rong and Xiao-Dong Su. Effect of body mass index on survival of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Chin J Cancer. 2017, 36:7. doi:10.1186/s40880-016-0170-7


Export citations

EndNote


SHARE THIS ARTICLE


Your Comments

  

 


Comments:


CJC Wechat 微信公众号

CJC触屏版


 

Editorial Manager


CC adopts Editorial Manager to manage its submissions from Dec.18, 2014
 

 

Reference style for  

 EndNote,
 Reference Manager



Editorial Manager


 

Year:

 

Month:

Advanced search

Subscription


CJC is now published by BioMed Central

© Chinese Journal of Cancer

Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center

651 Dongfeng Road East, Guangzhou 510060, P. R. China